Les Préludes, by Franz Liszt




Les Préludes, d’après Lamartine is the third of Franz Liszt’s symphonic poems. It was the first to be performed, and the only one to find a permanent place in the orchestral repertoire. Liszt invented the symphonic poem, but audiences and orchestras alike found them difficult and forbidding. Symphonic poems have two basic characteristics. Musically, they contain all of the structural characteristics of a traditional four-movement symphony within a single movement. They also attempt to unite music and literature by means of a preface, or program, that Liszt provided. The program of Les Préludes For Les Préludes, Liszt prepared a prose interpretation … Continue reading

The Pines of Rome by Ottorino Respighi




Ottorino Respighi became what seemed unthinkable a hundred years ago: an Italian composer of orchestral music. He composed no successful operas at all. Instead, he wrote the first significant Italian contributions to orchestral music since the Baroque era. He studied composition with the Russian Nicolai Rimsky-Korsakov. Under his influence, and that of the French Impressionists and Richard Strauss, Respighi wrote some very successful symphonic tone poems, foreign in form, but  very Italian in subject matter. The Pines of Rome (1924), the best known of them, is one of three tone poems that celebrate Rome–along with The Fountains of Rome (1918) … Continue reading