Victor Cornette and his trombone method




For most of a century, advanced trombone students have worked from a combination of the trombone method by Victor Cornette (1795-1868) and the Melodious Etudes compiled from Marco Bordogni’s vocalises by Johannes Rochut. Cornette published the first edition of his method in 1831. The Paris Conservatory taught trombone when it opened in 1795, but soon abandoned it. It didn’t offer trombone again until after Cornette published his method, … Continue reading

Earliest jazz recordings: this year’s the 100th anniversary




A record of two songs by the Original Dixieland Jass band appeared in May 1917. It has gone down in history as the earliest jazz recording. Or was it? In any case, it made a huge splash. Recordings of dozens of other pieces with either jazz in the title or the name of the group appeared before the end of the year. The year 1917 marks a turning point not only in a particular art form, but in black music. Even though whites made the overwhelming majority of the earliest jazz recordings. … Continue reading

Beloved Christmas carols: In dulci jubilo / Good Christian men, rejoice




Most of what we call Christmas carols are actually Christmas hymns. “In dulci jubilo” is a true carol, that is, a medieval dance tune. Carol texts could be either sacred or secular. Sacred texts usually concerned major feast days, including the birth of Jesus, thus the association of carols with Christmas music. Folk instruments, including drums and other percussion, frequently accompanied carols and other dances. The use of dance rhythms, instruments, and non-Latin texts made carols like “In dulci jubilo” unsuitable for use in Roman Catholic church services. But the Medieval world knew no separation between religious and secular life. … Continue reading

A revolution in the music business: the phonograph




New media and services like YouTube and Spotify are shaking up the music industry. But they have no more impact than the phonograph record player did just over a hundred years ago. Not very long ago, if anyone wanted to experience music, they had to go to a concert or make it themselves. Many towns and smaller cities had no local professional concert organizations. Their citizens could attend a concert only if traveling performers chose to stop there. On the other hand, nearly every middle class household had a piano. Many people sang and played other instruments. Even small towns … Continue reading

Classical music that used to be popular music




You don’t have to be a classical music lover to recognize names of important classical composers. Bach Beethoven Brahms Wagner Liszt Rossini Except that the music of Rossini and others was considered popular music when it was first heard. And people who liked classical music scorned it. One French writer divided musicians into two kinds: classicists and Rossinists. So what else that we think of as classical music used to be considered popular? And what changed? … Continue reading

The birth of the popular music industry




  What’s the popular music industry? For that matter, what’s popular music? Most people today seem to equate “music industry” with “recording industry,” but it’s older than that. There’s no point in talking about a “classical music industry.”I looked that term up and only found articles about how badly classical music leaders conduct business. Merriam-Webster offers several definitions of “industry.” Only three seem applicable: systematic labor especially for some useful purpose or the creation of something of value a department or branch of a craft, art, business, or manufacture; especially:  one that employs a large personnel and capital especially in … Continue reading

How Tin Pan Alley transformed the popular music industry




Tin Pan Alley represents the apex of the sheet music industry in the United States. The term refers to publishers concentrated on 28th Street between Fifth and Sixth Avenue in Manhattan. They raised marketing and commercialism to unprecedented sophistication. The popular music industry traces its history back to 18th century London. Thomas Arne and other composers wrote songs specifically for a mass audience. No one had cared so much about an unsophisticaled audience before. … Continue reading

10 odd facts about trombonists you’d never guess




Trombonists, who have been mostly human, have always had lives. Some of them have commanded great personal and professional respect, but not others. The trombone itself has had its ups and downs. In fact, the high points in the reputations of the trombone and trombonists have not necessarily coincided. Sometimes playing trombone has been their principal profession, more often, though, not. In fact, most musicians throughout history have had to earn money from something besides music in order to survive. … Continue reading

Classical and pop music: 200 years of rivalry




Is classical music or pop music better? Perhaps you’ve seen conversations on sites like quora.com or debate.org. Did you know that these arguments have been going on for more than 200 years? Typically, someone will ask if classical music is superior to pop music, or if classical music has to be elitist. Or perhaps someone will post a putdown of one, which will attract passionate defenses. It amazes me how little people in these discussions actually know. Some of them, for example, contrast classical music and modern music. That’s on both sides. They seem not to know that popular music … Continue reading

9 odd wind instruments you have probably never seen




Over the last couple of centuries, inventors have brought out a remarkable number of odd wind instruments that somehow never became successful. Or if they did, their success didn’t last. In some cases, pieces in the standard orchestral repertoire call for one or more. There is a growing interest in restoring them for performance of this music. Ophicleide At the beginning of the 19th century, as the orchestra began to expand, only two instruments existed that could serve as bass of the brass choir: the bass trombone and the serpent. Neither was satisfactory. The serpent, a cornett-like bass instrument invented … Continue reading