Two British composers as trombonists: Holst and Elgar




Gustav Holst made his living for a while as a trombonist. Edward Elgar, for some reason, decided to learn to play trombone when he was 43. Holst, therefore, was a trombonist who later became a well-known composer. History has known several trombonist composers. If we include jazz trombonists who become noted arrangers, the number becomes legion. Elgar, on the other hand is an example of a well-known composer who later became a trombonist–of sorts. He is probably not unique, but there can’t be very many others. When Holst was a music student at the Royal College of Music, he was … Continue reading

The oddest-looking trombones ever, by Adolphe Sax




Everyone knows what a trombone looks like. Even modern valve trombones maintain the familiar shape of the slide trombone. In the nineteenth-century, however, when instrument designers competed with each others’ various valve configurations, there seemed no reason to keep their creations looking like a slide trombone. The shape of the bore, not the shape into which the tubing is bent, determines what will sound like a trombone. Adolphe Sax introduced many odd-looking valve trombones, none odder than his six independent valve invention.   The very earliest valves did not work especially well, and it took a while to find the … Continue reading

Five trombone soloists we hardly remember




The idea of the trombone as a solo instrument seems to appeal mostly to trombonists. Trombone soloists who tour or record extensively can develop quite a following. Nowadays, many can be found on You Tube, where people can not only hear, but watch performances. As long as they remain freely on line, people will be able to find them and enjoy them indefinitely. It’s easy for us to forget earlier generations of trombone soloists. A trombonist’s reputation does not necessarily vanish after his or her death or retirement simply for lack of recordings. It is easy to find information about … Continue reading

Trombones in dramatic music before opera




Opera arose from several different sources, among them the revival of Roman comedy in the late 1400s, mostly intended for entertainment at various ruling courts in Italy. It didn’t take long for rulers to see political and diplomatic advantages in mounting spectacular performances of them, and by the middle of the 1500s, they routinely mounted comedies with musical interludes between the acts. These interludes, intermedii in Italian, grew to become dramatic spectacles in their own right, involving the musical talents of the entire court establishment. Most Italian courts of the time boasted excellent trombonists. The music-loving Medici family managed to … Continue reading

The glissando: from bad trombone technique to a common performance idiom




Perhaps no technique more perfectly characterizes the idiom of the slide trombone as the glissando. Its first deliberate use in performance is fairly recent in the long history of the trombone, and its acceptance as a legitimate technique came somewhat later. Nowadays, we tend to think of glissando and portamento as synonyms. They are, indeed, played exactly the same way, so it seems odd that the portamento enjoyed early approval and that all manner of musicians, including trombonists, strongly disapproved of the glissando within living memory. Daniel Speer provides the earliest reference to the glissando I have found (1687), when … Continue reading

The Wagner tuba: the orchestra’s least known brass member




What is the most recently member of the orchestra? The tuba, invented in 1835 would seem to qualify, except that Richard Wagner’s Ring Cycle and some other very important works require an even newer instrument called the Wagner tuba. The invention of valves in 1815 led to the development of numerous new brass instruments. None of them produced the kind of sound Wagner envisioned as he started work on Das Rheingold. In 1854 he set out to find someone who could design something suitable. Playable specimens of the ancient Norse lur, when played by hornists of Wagner’s time had a … Continue reading

Tielman Susato: trombonist and music publisher




You can’t find very many trombonists in basic music history textbooks, but some like Gustav Holst and Tielman Susato (ca.1510-after 1570) belong there for their other achievements. As a member of the town band in the Flemish city of Antwerp, Susato played a variety of instruments. He was also a composer of some merit, but his reputation rests on the publishing company he founded and ran for 18 years. It used to be thought that he died about the time his publishing company ceased operations, but as it turns out, he moved to Sweden and, among other things, dabbled in … Continue reading

Carl Traugott Queisser: Being a musician in the first half of the nineteenth century




Trombonists know the name Carl Traugott Queisser (1800-1846) as one of the first internationally famous trombone soloists. A Concertino for Trombone by Ferdinand David that probably every trombone major in college plays at one time or another was composed for Queisser. A famous virtuoso is certainly not a typical musician, but in many ways Queisser is representative of how many different roles a professional musician of his time had to perform in order to make a living. Like most German instrumentalists, Queisser received his first musical training as a Stadtpfeifer, or town musician. He began his apprenticeship at age 11 … Continue reading

Willie Colón and salsa music




According to Gerald Sloan, Willie Colón “has done more than anyone since Tommy Dorsey to keep [the] trombone before the public eye.” Yet in comparison to jazz trombonists he seems little known in this country. He has been closely associated with a style of Latin music known as salsa. Some Latinos object to the term salsa, which means “sauce,” applied to a musical style. Colón embraces it. After all, it had plenty of idiomatic meanings before it was applied to music. Different Latin music traditions developed in various Latin American countries. They have certain things in common including a Spanish … Continue reading

Pending trombone legislation




I saw this on Trombone-L some time ago, chuckled, and deleted it. Now it has just come across another list, and it seems worth sharing. If you like it, you can bookmark it here. Surely that will make finding it again easier than hunting through old emails! []]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]]] WASHINGTON, D.C. – Each year thousands are people are killed, maimed or annoyed by trombones. The statistics of head, neck and even shoulder injuries sustained by reed players, french horn and string sections seated within reach of the deadly seventh position are truly shocking…not to mention forced early retirement due to ever-increasing … Continue reading